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When Norm Macdonald died earlier this month, late-night TV lost one of its greatest guests. His shaggy dog stories usually ended with groaners, but he made his way to the punchline like a jazz artist, finding notes no other comedians could hit.

Here, in alphabetical order, are 10 other celebrities that should join Macdonald in the Guest Hall of Fame.

Albert Brooks: When he wasn't churning out classic films like "Lost in America," Brooks was sharing creative routines with Johnny Carson that must have taken months to develop. His lesson on how to impersonate Curly from the Three Stooges, with the aid of a hot potato and black pepper, will have you howling.

Bob Dole: "The Daily Show" was a fairly standard talk show until Jon Stewart decided to put media and politics in the spotlight. Appearances from the former Senate majority leader probably played a role in that decision. Dole used comedy to get across political points better than anyone not named Abraham Lincoln.

Tom Hanks: His reputation as America's Dad has as much to do with his talk-show appearances as his film work. He peaked during the last episode of "Late Night With David Letterman," dissecting Elvis Presley's "Roustabout" and detailing the time he accidentally broke Slappy White's golf clubs.

Nathan Lane: If he hadn't focused on Broadway, this actor could have easily made a career out of a stand-up comedy. No wonder Seth Meyers recently recruited him to fill in for a last-minute cancellation. Lane always delivers.

Jennifer Lawrence.
Jennifer Lawrence.

Francois Mori, AP file

Jennifer Lawrence: The Oscar winner might eventually behave like Hollywood royalty. Let's hope it doesn't happen soon. When Lawrence spills her most embarrassing moments with an unfiltered delivery, she's your best friend opening up after too many glasses of wine.

Jay Leno: Before joining the establishment, Leno was the most brilliant stand-up on the circuit, griping about trivial matters in suits so loud that you reached for your sunglasses. His frequent appearances on "Late Night With David Letterman" were pivotal in making his future rival's show the hippest joint on TV.

Richard Pryor: Carson didn't feature the most diverse lineup, which may explain why he relied on Pryor to explain the "Black experience." The legendary comic obliged — to a point. Watching Pryor bristle at the host's ignorance was funnier than 80% of his movies.

Richard Pryor.
Richard Pryor.

Reed Saxon, AP file

Amy Sedaris: She's stolen many scenes on everything from "Sex and the City" to "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt." But her most winning accomplishment is stealing Letterman's heart. The host was obviously smitten every time the actor graced his stage.

Martin Short: The New Yorker magazine recently called him the greatest talk-show guest of all time. Hard to argue. Whether he's appearing as the obnoxious Jiminy Glick or crooning an original song, Short's love of show business shines through.

Sarah Silverman: Booking your girlfriend can be tricky. Booking your ex-girlfriend can be downright dangerous. Jimmy Kimmel has done both with wild success. They've continued to have superb on-screen chemistry, although nothing can match her on-air "confession" that she was cheating on him with Matt Damon.