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Homemade pizza doesn't have to be second best. Try one of these dough options with any combination of toppings, from Baba Ghanoush and mint to potatoes and goat cheese.

Neapolitan-Style Pizza Dough

Serves 8 to 16 (makes enough dough for four 10-inch pizzas).

Note: The dough needs to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes, then in the back of the refrigerator (so it’s as cold as possible) for 20 to 30 hours, and for 2 hours at room temperature before shaping. The dough can be frozen after being shaped into balls following the first rise, for up to 3 months. Defrost overnight in the refrigerator or on the counter for a few hours before proceeding with the second rise.

• About 5 c. bread flour, plus more for the work surface

• 1/2 tsp. instant yeast

• About 1 2/3 c. cold water

• 2 tsp. sea salt

• Olive oil, for greasing

Directions

Combine the flour, yeast and 1 2/3 cup cold water in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough-hook attachment. Mix on the lowest speed until the dough just comes together and there is no trace of dry ingredients. Remove the bowl from the mixer, cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Return the bowl to the stand mixer (still with the dough hook) and add the salt; mix on medium-low speed for 7 to 10 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic.

Lightly flour your work surface. Turn out the dough there, shaping it into a tight ball. Use some oil to lightly grease a separate mixing bowl; transfer the dough, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 20 hours, and up to 30 hours.

Re-flour your work surface. Turn out the chilled dough there, allowing it to gently release from the bowl. Divide it into 4 equal portions; about 250 grams each.

Lightly grease a baking sheet with oil. Work with 1 portion of dough at a time, pulling its corners toward the center so they meet; press lightly so they attach, but do not flatten. The dough will tighten up and take on a rounded shape. Flip over the dough so it is seam-side down. Gently cup the dough in your upturned hands. Carefully move it in circles, taking care to prevent any tears. This will help create a tight, even ball.

Repeat this process with the remaining portions of dough. (At this point, the dough can be sealed in zip-top bags and frozen, for up to 3 months.) Place the dough balls on the baking sheet. Brush them lightly with oil and cover with plastic wrap. Let them rest at room temperature until the dough has nearly doubled in size, about 2 hours.

At least 30 minutes before baking, position a rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element of the oven; preheat to 500 degrees or whatever its highest numbered temperature setting is. Have your pizza toppings assembled and ready to go.

Place 1 dough ball on a well-floured surface, then sprinkle more flour on the dough itself. Starting in the center, work the dough into a small disk by pushing your fingers flat into the dough, leaving the edges untouched. Flip over the disk and continue until you have shaped it to about 8 inches in diameter.

Before you move on to stretching the dough, preheat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet on the stove top over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Open the oven door for 10 seconds if you have an electric oven (this lets some heat escape to make sure the broiler will actually turn on even though the oven has reached its maximum temperature) and then turn on the broiler (to high, if you have a choice).

Drape the dough over the back of your hands and knuckles, being careful not to tear it. Gently rotate the dough, stretching it little by little until it is 10 inches in diameter.

Carefully transfer the dough to the hot skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt because it will be very hot). Add your toppings, leaving a 1/2- to 3/4-inch border around the edge. Give the dough an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute to cook; this will help ensure the bottom crust will be crisped.

Use oven mitts to transfer the skillet to the oven. Broil the pizza for a total of 3 to 5 minutes, rotating front to back halfway through, until the crust looks puffed and browned. Don’t walk away. A little charring on the crust or toppings is OK, but even a few seconds too much will burn the pizza.

Remove the skillet from the oven, then use tongs to transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool. After a few minutes, transfer the pizza to a cutting board. Cut it into slices, and serve right away.

Nutrition information per each of 16 servings:

Calories 140 Fat 1 g Sodium 290 mg Carbs 27 g

Saturated fat 0 g Added sugars 0 g

Protein 4 g Cholesterol 0 mg Dietary fiber 1 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 1 carb

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Whole-Wheat Pizza Dough

Serves 6 to 12 (makes enough dough for three 10-inch pizzas).

Note: The finished dough can be portioned, coated lightly in cooking oil spray or olive oil, sealed in zip-top bags and frozen for up to 3 months. Defrost overnight in the refrigerator and then let it come to room temperature for 30 minutes before shaping and baking. Adapted from Sally McKenney at sallysbakingaddiction.com.

• 1 tsp. sugar

• 1 tbsp. instant yeast

• 1 1/2 c. warm water (105 to 115 degrees)

• 1 tbsp. olive oil, plus more for greasing and brushing

• 1 tbsp. honey

• 1 tsp. salt

• About 3 c. whole-wheat flour, divided, plus more for dusting

• 1 to 2 tsp. shredded Parmigiano- Reggiano cheese, optional

Directions

Combine the sugar, yeast, 1 1/2 cups warm water, 1 tablespoon oil, honey and salt in a stand mixer fitted with a dough-hook attachment. Mix on low speed for 30 seconds. Add all but about 1/3 cup of the whole-wheat flour; mix on low speed until a dough starts to come together.

Increase the speed to medium-low; continue to mix for about 5 minutes. If your dough is looking very wet and almost pourable, add some of the reserved 1/3 cup flour, a tablespoon or two at a time. Continue to mix, adding more flour as needed, until the dough begins to gather around the dough hook and looks stretchy as it pulls away from the sides of the bowl; this may take as long as 15 minutes. It will not form a ball or pull away from the bowl completely. The dough may look very wet, but all will be well.

To test whether your dough is ready, pinch a small piece of dough away with your fingertips. If it breaks immediately as you stretch it, keep kneading. If it seems elastic and comes away from the rest of the dough in a stretchy, almost translucent sheet, that means the gluten has sufficiently formed.

Lightly grease a separate mixing bowl with oil. Shape the wet, sticky dough into a ball as best you can, then transfer it to the bowl, turning the dough over to coat it on all sides. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and allow the dough to rise in a warm environment for about 2 hours, or until it has about doubled in size. (A closed microwave where you have just heated some water for a minute or two works well.)

About 90 minutes into the rise, position a rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element of the oven; preheat the oven to 500 degrees or whatever its highest numbered temperature setting is. The oven should preheat for at least 30 minutes.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, then generously dust it with flour.

Gently deflate the dough to release trapped air. Divide the dough into three portions. Roll each portion into a ball and then place them on baking sheet. Loosely cover with lightly greased plastic wrap and let the dough rest for at least 20 minutes, and up to 1 hour.

(After this rest, you can freeze the dough portions for up to 3 months.)

Generously flour your work surface. Transfer 1 ball of dough there and sprinkle more flour on top of the dough. (If you plan to use all the portions of dough right away, keep them covered.) Use your fingertips to start flattening the dough into a round. Continue to gently stretch the dough until you have a round about 10 inches in diameter, frequently rotating it and flouring the counter or dough as needed so nothing sticks.

Open the oven door for 10 seconds if you have an electric oven (this lets some heat escape to make sure the broiler will actually turn on even though the oven has reached its maximum temperature), and then turn on the broiler (to high, if that is an option). Have your pizza toppings ready to go nearby.

Preheat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet on the stove top, over medium heat, for 3 to 5 minutes. Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt since it will be very hot). Allow the dough to start to cook and dry out on bottom (a minute or less; you’ll see it looking less wet and starting to puff).

Add your toppings, leaving a 1/2- to 3/4-inch border around the edges. Brush the edges of the crust with oil, then sprinkle them with the Parmigiano-Reggiano, if using. Give the dough an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute to cook; this will help ensure the bottom of the crust will be crisped.

Use oven mitts to transfer the skillet to the oven. Broil the pizza for 3 to 5 minutes, rotating front to back halfway through, until the crust looks puffed and browned. Don’t walk away. A little charring on the crust or toppings is OK, but even a few seconds too much will burn the pizza. Remove the skillet from the oven, then use tongs to transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool for a few minutes. Transfer the pizza to a cutting board. Cut into slices and serve right away.

Nutrition information per each of 12 servings:

Calories 150 Fat 2 g

Sodium 200 mg Carbs 29 g

Saturated fat 0 g Added sugars 2 g

Protein 4 g Cholesterol 0 mg Dietary fiber 1 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 1 carb.

Baba Ghanoush Pizza With Pepperoncini, Mint and Chile Oil

Serves 2 to 4 (makes one 10-inch pie).

Note: The roasted eggplant dip (baba ghanoush) makes a great base for this cheese-free mixture of fresh and pickled topping ingredients. This combo works well atop a Neapolitan-style crust. Pepperoncini are thin small, red chiles, available pickled. The topping is from the Washington Post.

• 1 portion Neapolitan-Style Pizza Dough (see recipe)

• Flour, for dusting

• 1/2 c. homemade or store-bought baba ghanoush (see Note)

• 1/2 c. halved cherry tomatoes

• 6 small pepperoncini (drained), cut lengthwise in half or sliced (see Note)

• 2 to 4 tbsp. shelled roasted unsalted pistachios

• Chile oil, for drizzling

• 1/4 c. fresh mint leaves, whole or chopped

Directions

At least 30 minutes before you bake the pizza, position a rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element; preheat the oven to its highest numbered temperature setting. Have your toppings ready to go.

Place 1 portion of dough on a well-floured surface, then sprinkle more flour on the dough itself. Starting in the center, work the dough into a small disk by pushing your fingers flat into the dough, leaving the edges untouched. Flip over the disk and continue until you have shaped it to about 8 inches in diameter.

Before you move on to stretching the dough, preheat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet on the stove top over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Open the oven door for 10 seconds if you have an electric oven (this lets some heat escape to make sure the broiler will actually turn on even though the oven has reached its maximum temperature) and then turn on the broiler (to high, if you have a choice).

Drape the dough over the back of your hands and knuckles, being careful not to tear it. Gently rotate the dough, stretching it little by little until it is 10 inches in diameter. Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt since it will be very hot).

Spread the baba ghanoush evenly over the crust, leaving a 1/2- to 3/4-inch border around the edges. Scatter the cherry tomato halves and pepperoncini evenly over the baba ghanoush. Give the dough an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute to cook; this will help ensure the bottom of the crust will be crisped.

Use oven mitts to transfer the skillet to the oven. Broil the pizza for 3 to 4 minutes, rotating halfway through, until the crust looks puffed and browned. Pull it out just long enough to scatter the pistachios (to taste) over the pizza, then return it to the broiler for 30 seconds or so.

Don’t walk away. A little charring on the crust or toppings is OK, but even a few seconds too much will burn the pizza. Remove the skillet from the oven, then use tongs to transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool for a few minutes.

Transfer the pizza to a cutting board. Drizzle with the chile oil, then scatter the mint on top. Cut into slices and serve right away.

Nutrition information per each of 4 servings:

Calories 240 Fat 9 g Sodium 400 mg Saturated fat 1 g

Carbohydrates 35 g Added sugars 1 g

Protein 7 g Cholesterol 0 mg Dietary fiber 3 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 vegetable, 2 starch, 1 ½ fat.

Pepperoni and Potato Pizza

Serves 2 to 4 (makes one 10-inch pie).

Note: Here, the base sauce is a puréed mix of pepperoni, onion, olive oil and garlic; its spiciness is offset by the tender potatoes, nutty Gruyère and mild goat cheese. You’ll make more pepperoni sauce than you need for this recipe; it can be cooked, cooled and refrigerated up to 2 weeks in advance. The potatoes can be roasted and refrigerated a day or two in advance. Toast the fennel seed in a small dry skillet over medium heat, shaking the skillet often to keep the seeds from burning. They will become fragrant and slightly darker in color. The sauce recipe is adapted from chef Mike Isabella; the topping recipe is from the Washington Post.

For the sauce

• 3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

• 1/2 small onion, cut into small dice

• 3 medium garlic cloves, cut into very thin slices

• 8 oz. pepperoni, cut into thin slices (can substitute turkey pepperoni)

• 1/2 tsp. fennel seed, toasted (see Note)

• 1/2 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes

• 3 canned whole plum tomatoes, chopped, with their juices

• 3/4 c. no-salt-added chicken broth

• 1 bay leaf

For the pizza

• 6 to 8 oz. fingerling or small Yukon Gold potatoes, cut lengthwise into 1/4-in. slices, unpeeled

• 1 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

• Kosher salt

• Freshly ground black pepper

• 1 portion Neapolitan-Style Pizza Dough (see recipe)

• Flour, for dusting

• 2 tbsp. finely chopped fresh chives

• 2 oz. Gruyère cheese, thinly sliced

• 2 oz. plain goat cheese

Directions

For the sauce: Heat the oil until shimmering in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic; cook for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring often, until golden and fragrant.

Stir in the pepperoni; cook for about 5 minutes, until fragrant and evenly coated, then add the toasted fennel seed and crushed red pepper flakes. Cook for 1 minute, stirring.

Add the tomatoes and their juices, the broth and bay leaf; stir to incorporate. Once the mixture starts to bubble at the edges, cover and cook for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. The pepperoni slices will be soft, with a deeper color. Remove from the heat.

Working in batches as needed, transfer to a food processor or a high-powered blender (including the bay leaf). Purée until smooth. The yield is about 2 1/2 cups.

For the pizza: At least 30 minutes before you bake the pizza, position a rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element and preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Lay the potato slices on a rimmed baking sheet; drizzle with oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Toss to coat, laying them flat again as needed. Roast (upper rack) for 5 to 10 minutes, until just tender when pierced with a sharp knife. Let cool.

Increase the oven temperature to 500 degrees or its highest numbered temperature setting. Have your toppings ready to go.

Place one portion of dough on a well-floured surface, then sprinkle more flour on the dough itself. Starting in the center, work the dough into a small disk by pushing your fingers flat into the dough, leaving the edges untouched. Flip over the disk and continue until you have shaped it to about 8 inches in diameter.

Preheat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet on the stove top over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Open the oven door for 10 seconds if you have an electric oven (this lets some heat escape to make sure the broiler will actually turn on even though the oven has reached its maximum temperature) and then turn on the broiler (to high, if you have a choice).

Drape the dough over the back of your hands and knuckles, being careful not to tear it. Gently rotate the dough, stretching it little by little until it is 10 inches in diameter. Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt since it will be very hot).

Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt since it will be very hot).

Spread 1/4 to 1/3 cup of the pepperoni sauce, to taste, evenly over the crust, leaving a 1/2- to 3/4-inch border around the edges. Lay the potato slices on the sauce, then sprinkle half the chives on and around them. Cover with the slices of Gruyère, then place big pinches of the goat cheese around the pie.

Give the dough an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute to cook; this will help ensure the bottom of the crust will be crisped.

Use oven mitts to transfer the skillet to the oven. Broil the pizza for 3 to 5 minutes, rotating halfway through, until the crust looks puffed and browned. Don’t walk away. A little charring on the crust or toppings is OK, but even a few seconds too much will burn the pizza. Remove the skillet from the oven, then use tongs to transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool for a few minutes.

Transfer the pizza to a cutting board. Sprinkle with the remaining chives, then cut into slices and serve right away.

Nutrition information per each of 4 servings, using total of ⅓ of sauce:

Calories 430 Fat 24 g Sodium 800 mg

Carbohydrates 36 g Saturated fat 9 g Added sugars 0 g

Protein 17 g Cholesterol 40 mg Dietary fiber 2 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 1 ½ carb, 2 high-fat protein, 1 ½ fat.

Gluten-Free Pizza Dough

Serves 16 (makes enough for four 12-inch pies).

Note: The prep and consistency are different from what is involved in doughs made with wheat flour, but this recipe results in a slightly chewy crust that holds up well to a variety of toppings. In testing, we added some fresh herbs to the dough, which is optional; we also brushed the edges with oil and sprinkled them with cheese (to enhance color and texture). It is useful to use a kitchen scale for measuring the main ingredients. You will need a 12-inch-round, non-perforated pizza pan; we also liked using a pizza stone for the even heat it provides under the pan. The dough needs two 30-minute rests, plus a 15-minute rest once it is shaped. The finished dough (after two 30-minute rests) can be refrigerated for up to 1 day. Let it come to a cool room temperature (a 20-minute rest or so) before shaping. Adapted from “Genuine Pizza: Better Pizza at Home,” by Michael Schwartz with Olga Massov

• 6 c. gluten-free flour blend, preferably King Arthur Measure for Measure or Caputo Fiore Glut

• 1/2 c. powdered milk

• 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. baking powder

• 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. xanthan gum

• 1 tbsp. kosher salt

• 4 c. warm water

• 1/4 c. honey

• 10 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided, plus more for brushing

• 2 tbsp. instant yeast

• 1/4 c. minced fresh herbs (such as parsley, thyme, rosemary and/or oregano mix), optional

• Small handful shredded hard cheese, such as Parmigiano-Reggiano, optional

Directions

Combine the gluten-free flour blend, powdered milk, baking powder, xanthan gum and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough-hook attachment. Mix on low speed to incorporate.

Whisk together 4 cups warm water, honey, 2 tablespoons oil, yeast and about 2 cups of the blended flour mixture (from the stand-mixer bowl) in a separate mixing bowl; a few floating lumps are fine. Let it sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes, until bubbly and redolent of yeast.

Add that bubbly mixture back to the stand-mixer bowl; mix on medium-high speed for 4 minutes, to form a dough that is sticky and thick. If you are using the fresh herbs, toss them in at the third minute. Cover the bowl with a clean, damp towel and let the dough rest at room temperature for about 30 minutes.

(At this point, the dough can be covered with greased plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight.)

At least 30 minutes before you are ready to bake, place a pizza stone on the middle oven rack and preheat to 425 degrees.

To make one pizza, use 2 tablespoons oil to grease your 12-inch round pizza pan. Scoop one-quarter (about 1 pound/475 grams) of the rested dough onto the pan. Wet your fingers with water; start pushing the dough evenly outward, gently pressing it into a round that almost reaches the edges of the pan, because the dough will spread a bit as it bakes.

Let the pizza dough rest, uncovered, for 15 minutes. This would be a good time for you to assemble any toppings.

Bake (middle rack, pan on the pizza stone) for 8 to 10 minutes, just until the crust is set. Its surface will look opaque.

Remove from the oven and arrange the toppings on the crust. Lightly brush the edges of the crust with oil, then sprinkle them lightly with shredded cheese, if desired. Return to the oven and bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the crust is baked through and lightly browned on the bottom. Cut into slices and serve right away.

Nutrition information per each of 16 servings:

Calories 270 Fat 10 g Sodium 520 mg

Carbohydrates 43 g Saturated fat 1 g Added sugars 4 g

Protein 3 g Cholesterol 0 mg Dietary fiber 2 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 starch, 2 carb, 2 fat.

Caramelized Onion and Fontina Pizza With Crispy Kale

Serves 2 to 4 (makes one 10-inch pie).

Note: The combination of caramelized onions and nutty fontina reminds us of our favorite cheesy onion tarts. Store-bought kale chips add quick color and crunch. You will have more caramelized onions than you need for this recipe; they can be cooked, cooled and refrigerated for up to 2 weeks in advance. Bring to room temperature before using here. The topping recipe is from the Washington Post.

• 4 lb. white or yellow onions, halved and thinly sliced

• 1/4 c. water, or more as needed

• 2 tbsp. sherry vinegar

• 2 tsp. sugar, optional

• 1 portion Neapolitan-Style Pizza Dough (see recipe)

• Flour, for dusting

• 2 oz. Fontina cheese, cut into thin slices

• 1 oz. store-bought crispy kale chips

• Shredded Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, optional

Directions

To make the caramelized onions, combine the onions and 1/4 cup water in a heavy-bottomed pot. Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally and scraping the pot to dislodge any bits, for 1 hour or until caramel golden in color. Sprinkle with the sherry vinegar and sugar, if using; reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for an additional 20 minutes or so, until deeply browned. Let cool.

At least 30 minutes before you bake the pizza, position a rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element; preheat the oven to its highest numbered temperature setting. Have your toppings ready to go.

Place the portion of dough on a well-floured surface, then sprinkle more flour on the dough itself. Starting in the center, work the dough into a small disk by pushing your fingers flat into the dough, leaving the edges untouched. Flip over the disk and continue until you have shaped it to about 8 inches in diameter.

Before you move on to stretching the dough, preheat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet on the stove top over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Open the oven door for 10 seconds if you have an electric oven (this lets some heat escape to make sure the broiler will actually turn on even though the oven has reached its maximum temperature) and then turn on the broiler (to high, if you have a choice).

Drape the dough over the back of your hands and knuckles, being careful not to tear it. Gently rotate the dough, stretching it little by little until it is 10 inches in diameter. Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt since it will be very hot). Allow the dough to just start to cook and dry out on bottom (a minute or less; you’ll see it looking less wet and starting to puff).

Spread 1/2 cup of the caramelized onions evenly over the crust, leaving a 1/2- to 3/4-inch border around the edges. Cover with the slices of fontina.

Give the dough an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute to cook; this will help ensure the bottom of the crust will be crisped.

Use oven mitts to transfer the skillet to the oven. Broil the pizza for 3 to 4 minutes, rotating halfway through, until the crust looks puffed and browned. Pull it out just long enough to scatter the crispy kale chips over the pizza, then return it to the broiler for another 30 seconds or so.

Don’t walk away. A little charring on the crust or toppings is OK, but even a few seconds too much will burn the pizza. Remove the skillet from the oven, then use tongs to transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool for a few minutes.

Transfer the pizza to a cutting board. Scatter with shredded Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, if desired, then cut into slices and serve right away.

Nutrition information per each of 4 servings, using half the onions:

Calories 300 Fat 7 g Sodium 445 mg

Carbohydrates 50 g Saturated fat 3 g Added sugars 0 g

Protein 11 g Cholesterol 16 mg Dietary fiber 4 g

Exchanges per serving: 2 starch, 1 ½ carb, ½ high-fat protein.

Whipped Ricotta Pizza With Figs and Walnuts

Serves 2 to 4 (makes one 10-inch pie).

Note: These toppings work especially well with a whole-wheat pizza crust, but feel free to choose a different crust. To add a bit of heat and spice to those toppings, use a hot/spiced honey. If you are making a gluten-free pie, you can prepare the toppings while the crust partakes. The topping recipe is from the Washington Post; the dough recipe is adapted from Sally McKenney at sallysbakingaddiction.com.

• 2 oz. (heaping 1/2 c.) whole-milk ricotta cheese

• 2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing

• Kosher salt

• Freshly ground black pepper

• Whole-wheat flour, for dusting

• 1 portion Whole-Wheat Pizza Dough (see recipe)

• 2 1/2 oz. (packed 1/2 c.) dried figs, stemmed and cut lengthwise in half

• 2 tbsp. honey, or more as needed, divided

• 1 to 2 tsp. shredded Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, for sprinkling

• About 2 oz. (1/2 c.) walnut halves

• Handful baby arugula leaves, rinsed and dried

Directions

Place the ricotta in a mini-food processor; with the motor running, drizzle in the 2 tablespoons oil to form a smooth, whipped consistency. Season lightly with salt and pepper.

At least 30 minutes before you bake the pizza, position a rack 4 to 6 inches from the broiler element; preheat the oven to 500 degrees or its highest numbered temperature setting.

Generously flour your work surface. Transfer the portion of dough there, and sprinkle more flour on top of the dough. (If you plan to use all the portions of dough right away, keep them covered.) Use your fingertips to start flattening the dough into a round. Continue to gently stretch the dough until you have a round about 10 inches in diameter, frequently rotating it and flouring the counter or dough as needed so nothing sticks.

Open the oven door for 10 seconds if you have an electric oven (this lets some heat escape to make sure the broiler will actually turn on even though the oven has reached its maximum temperature) and then turn on the broiler (to high, if that is an option). Have your pizza toppings ready to go nearby.

Preheat a 12-inch cast-iron skillet on the stove top, over medium heat, for 3 to 5 minutes. Carefully transfer the dough to the skillet, smoothing it into place with your hands or by sliding and shaking the skillet (use a folded towel or oven mitt since it will be very hot).

Allow the dough to start to cook and dry out on the bottom (a minute or less; you’ll see it looking less wet and starting to puff).

Spread the whipped ricotta evenly over the crust, leaving a 1/2- to 3/4-inch border around the edges. Scatter the figs (most cut sides up) evenly over the cheese, then drizzle with 1 tablespoon honey.

Brush the edge of the crust lightly with oil, then sprinkle it with the Parmigiano-Reggiano, as needed. Give the dough an additional 30 seconds to 1 minute to cook; this will help ensure the bottom of the crust will be crisped.

Use oven mitts to transfer the skillet to the oven. Broil the pizza for 3 to 4 minutes, rotating halfway through, until the crust looks puffed and browned. Pull it out just long enough to scatter the walnuts over the pizza, then return it to the broiler for 30 seconds or so.

Don’t walk away. A little charring on the crust or toppings is OK, but even a few seconds too much will burn the pizza. Remove the skillet from the oven, then use tongs to transfer the pizza to a wire rack to cool for a few minutes.

Transfer the pizza to a cutting board. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon honey, then top with the arugula. Cut into slices and serve right away, with more honey for drizzling at the table.

Nutrition information per each of 4 servings:

Calories 405 Fat 20 g Sodium 225 mg

Carbohydrates 51 g Saturated fat 3 g Added sugars 10 g

Protein 9 g Cholesterol 8 mg Dietary fiber 4 g

Exchanges per serving: 1 fruit, 2 starch, ½ carb, ½ high-fat protein, 3 fat.