Columnist | Your Money

Chris Farrell is economics editor for American Public Media's weekly "Marketplace Money" show and author of "The New Frugality." He answers reader questions on most Sundays. Send questions to cfarrell@mpr.org and put "Your Money" in the subject line.


Do retirement warnings go too far?

People are creative about solving problems when income changes. And while experts recommend saving over $1 million, retirement also represents a change in lifestyle.


Chris Farrell: A fundamental change in interest rates is taking hold

For four decades, bond yields have been falling. But the fight against inflation is changing all that.


Chris Farrell: Amid the gloomy news, an old friend can revive your soul

When things look bad, take a look around for underappreciated opportunities.


Chris Farrell: As crypto inches to the mainstream, caution remains the watchword

Use money you can afford to lose, not retirement funds, to invest in cryptocurrencies, our columnist suggests.


Chris Farrell: Building a legacy is an essential project

Thinking about legacy involves acting on practicalities such as writing wills and health care directives.


Farrell: For college graduates, it's a time to explore life and make smart money moves

Stretch out school loans for the moment, save what you can and build the habit of generosity.


Chris Farrell: Even in a tight job market, late-career job seekers need an extra hand

The pandemic made workers of all ages rethink their goals and priorities, author Kerry Hannon writes.


Chris Farrell: It's too early to use retirement savings to speculate in cryptocurrency

Fidelity's decision to let 401(k) savers put some of their investment in bitcoin is highly risky, our columnist says.


Farrell: Should you worry about the prospect of low investment returns?

I'd like to take a step back from current market and economic turmoil to raise a longer-term financial concern that is getting increased attention.…


How much you spend in retirement may lessen with age

The 4% inflation-adjusted spending rule might be too conservative for near-retirees.