MaryJo Webster | Star Tribune
Data Editor

MaryJo Webster joined the Star Tribune in April 2015. She has had stints as a data journalist as USA Today, Digital First Media, the St. Paul Pioneer Press, the Center for Public Integrity, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. Early in her career, she also worked as a reporter and editor at papers in New Ulm, Minn., and Oshkosh, Wis.


Black drivers twice as likely as whites to be stopped by St. Paul police

Black motorists also were almost three times as likely to be frisked or searched.


In the money chase, DFL candidates for governor beating Republicans

Large imbalance in money raised last year has some in the GOP worried.


Tracking fundraising in Minnesota's gubernatorial race

As of the most recent filing, the DFL's gubernatorial candidates are out-raising the GOP.


Open enrollment keeps students, resources flowing into Minnetonka

Minnetonka school officials criticized on two fronts: Race and numbers.


Are the Vikings the NFL's most tragic playoff team?

A Star Tribune analysis shows the Vikings do unexpectedly lose a significant number of postseason games, but aren't necessarily the worst.


Can you guess how Minnesota's population has changed over time?

Try your hand as demographer and draw where you think the trend lines go.


Tax plan would have dramatic effect in Minnesota

The state's businesses stand to get large tax cuts, while limits on deductions for state and local taxes could pinch individuals and families who itemize.


How broke students are driving up poverty rates in small college towns

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau estimates how much students influence poverty rates.


Three things the latest census data tells us about the Upper Midwest

U.S. Census Bureau data released last week sheds light on demographics and economics of counties and other small areas.


PART 3: How Minn. officers accused of serious crimes plea bargain to keep jobs

Officers with convictions – which might have cost them their careers in other states – can exploit weaknesses in Minnesota's licensing rules to keep their jobs.