Jim Spencer | Star Tribune
Washington Correspondent

Jim Spencer works in the Star Tribune's Washington, D.C., bureau. He covers the intersection of Minnesota businesses and industry with national politics, legislation and regulation. Spencer has more than three decades' experience as a news reporter, columnist, feature writer and sports writer.


Efforts pushing alternatives to four-year degree slow to catch on

As well-paying posts in manufacturing and trades go begging, the American dream of a bachelor's degree dies so hard that public officials find themselves in a culture war.


GOP tax overhaul takes aim at widely used deductions

Deductions on one-third of federal returns filed from Minnesota are on the chopping block.


Cargill gets praise for recruiting and supporting military vets and reservists

The agribusiness giant has earned praise for recruiting and supporting veterans and reservists.


North Dakota oil sees hurricane-related bump in prices

The energy reporting website Platts recently noted that "the Bakken crude differential in Clearbrook, Minnesota, soared to its highest level in four years."


Stretched for workers, Minn. businesses lament immigration pushback

Labor projections suggest the state needs to increase, not cut, legal immigration.


After others exit, Xcel CEO Fowke opts to stay with presidential panel

Benjamin Fowke called work on the security of infrastructure of "paramount importance."


Cargill receives award for treatment of reservists, National Guard members

Minnetonka-based ag giant honored for treatment of employees in military.


Stay or go? 3M CEO among executives under pressure to leave Trump advisory group

Social media campaigns called out business leaders who remain on two key panels.


For digital trade advocates, all eyes on NAFTA

U.S. exit from the TPP erased breakthrough internet measures.


Minnesota retailers played big role in thwarting border tax

Lobbying efforts by Best Buy and Target in the first six months of 2017 rivaled what they did for all of 2016. The financial numbers, drawn from government records, show the Minnesota companies' determination to kill a border adjustment tax on imports sought by the House GOP.