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The city of Benson has reopened its search for a new city manager after rejecting two candidates.

At a meeting earlier this month, the City Council discussed a timeline for finding candidates but acknowledged that "there are not people applying for positions right now. There's not a pool of them out there," according to Mayor Terri Collins.

City Manager Rob Wolfington retired last month, and the council rejected the two finalists it interviewed for the position. Finance Director Glen Pederson has been appointed acting manager until the position is filled, likely not until fall.

JOHN REINAN

LITTLE FALLS

Residents want vehicles out of yards

There are too many vehicles parked in yards, according to Little Falls residents, and too many running stop signs. That's according to Mayor Greg Zylka, who reported the complaints at a recent City Council work session.

Meanwhile, the city Planning Commission will propose an ordinance to allow alcohol in city parks. The animal control officer picked up five dead animals last month and impounded 15 more.

JOHN REINAN

EVELETH

Council member doesn't like roundabout plans

As Eveleth considers adding a roundabout to serve schools near Progress Parkway, opposition came from City Councilor Jim Perpich. According to minutes of a recent council work session, Perpich said he didn't think a roundabout would make things safer for students.

Vic Lund, traffic engineer for St. Louis County, explained that roundabouts are designed to limit speeds to 15-20 miles per hour and reduce the number of high-speed crashes. Perpich questioned how large trucks would get through the roundabout, and Lund said it would be double-laned and able to accommodate trucks.

The city will finalize plans for that and two other intersections over the next several months. Funding is expected to come through the state from a federal grant, but it hasn't been approved yet.

JOHN REINAN

WINONA

City to create a new, improved Fine Arts Commission

Winona is set to disband its Fine Arts Commission and create a new one based on a strategic plan for arts and culture in the city.

Winona has long recognized the importance of arts and culture in helping the city thrive, and the new commission would broaden its work to include areas such as tourism, culinary arts, the creative economy and community leadership.

The proposal also calls for creating a public art program and shifts the city's role in the arts from a direct provider of services to support and leadership of community efforts.

The City Council is set to vote on the proposal at its regular meeting Monday. If passed, a task force will be appointed to draft a new ordinance setting up the commission.

JOHN REINAN