Reporter | Consumer news

John Ewoldt is a business reporter for the Star Tribune. He writes about small and large retailers including supermarkets, restaurants, consumer issues and trends, and personal finance.  

A Midwesterner who grew up in Nebraska, went to college in South Dakota, and taught school in Iowa and Minnesota before becoming a consumer reporter, Ewoldt lives in Minneapolis with his partner. He likes looking for a bargain wherever he may be but is learning restraint to avoid hoarder status. He's starting to believe that maybe less is more.


Uptown restaurant Chino Latino closes after 20 years

Owners say the global street food restaurant "will live again" in new location.


Kitchen, flooring remodeling blitz benefits Jack Rubenstein wholesaler

The 84-year-old wholesaler now focuses on home-project deals.


Famous Dave's creating 'ghost kitchens,' dual concept through Johnny Carino's deal

Agreement allows chain to open kitchens or sites with Johnny Carino's.


Why do so many Twin Cities mall names end in 'dale'?

Southdale was designed to be more than a shopping experience, complete with a day care center, aviary, fish pond and sidewalk cafes.


Furniture retailer Room & Board has best August, September in history

Adjusting with the times, the retailer has expanded its online operation, which now accounts for 60% of its sales.


With business down more than a third, restaurants dreading winter chill

Without outdoor dining, restaurants say they will need aid from Washington.


Financial Planning Day in Minnesota goes virtual; free consultations offered

The annual event will be extended to six days because of the coronavirus pandemic.


Aldi off Lake Street reopening next week, joining other businesses in area

The Cub and Target rebuilding plans are moving forward as more businesses reopen after being damaged in the unrest following the killing of George Floyd.


Lunds & Byerlys to expand, move Highland Park store to former Ford site

The supermarket will anchor a retail/apartment complex at the new Highland Bridge.


Supermarket hazard pay because of COVID-19 going away

Some retailers have raised wages permanently, while others deal with new norm of pandemic times.