Maura Lerner | Star Tribune
Higher education reporter | Higher education

Maura Lerner is the higher-education reporter. Her reporting has been recognized by the National Press Club, the Society for Professional Journalists, the Minnesota Associated Press and the Frank Premack Public Affairs Journalism Award. Before joining the Star Tribune, Lerner was a senior producer for the MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour on PBS, and a reporter for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.


St. Cloud State University names new president

Wacker was an administrator at the University of Northern Colorado.


Saudi is first U student to earn highest degree in field of law

He wants to open a human rights center on campus where he teaches.


University of Minnesota regents vote down tuition freeze, seek more information

The Board of Regents will make a final decision in June.


Earl B. Gustafson, former Minnesota legislator and judge, dies at age 90

As the family story goes, Earl B. Gustafson wanted to become a professor at a small college someday. But when he started graduate school, his…


More Minnesota universities offer 'test-optional' admissions

Augsburg University in Minneapolis and Concordia University in St. Paul have both decided to stop requiring college-entrance exams as part of a growing national movement toward "test-optional" admissions.


New U plan calls for 2 percent tuition increase at Twin Cities campus

Three U campuses would freeze tuition under the proposal.


Nurturing a new diversity on campus: 'Diversity of thought'

Professors and students seek to bridge political differences with civil exchanges.


March: What happened to the campus Republicans at Carleton College?

Students, college leaders wary of lopsided politics.


Four Minnesota State two-year colleges get new leaders

The Minnesota State system has named new leaders for four of its two-year colleges. This week, the board of trustees approved the appointments of Carrie…


University of Minnesota's $34,000 probe of regent found no wrongdoing

Darrin Rosha, on the board since 2015, expressed frustration that a vague, anonymous accusation could set off such an aggressive investigation.