Mark Craig
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The Eagles on Sunday became only the fourth NFL team since 1953 to outscore four straight opponents by at least 23 points.

They destroyed those teams 152-45, allowing just two touchdowns. Carson Wentz threw 11 touchdown passes and one interception. And the advantage in rushing yards: 700-247, including 176-6 in Sunday’s 31-3 win over the Bears.

Wow.

But …

The foes were San Francisco, Denver, Dallas without Ezekiel Elliott and Chicago. Their combined record: 12-32. Since Oct. 29: 3-15.

Yes, the Eagles are good. But how good?

They’re a league-best 10-1 with a nine-game winning streak. But they’re 1-1 against teams that have a winning record heading into Week 13. Their signature victory is a 28-23 win at Carolina, which has lost two of five home games.

The other top six teams in the NFC and their records against teams with a winning record are: Vikings (4-2), Panthers (4-2), Saints (3-3), Rams (2-2) and Falcons (2-3).

The good news is we won’t have to wait long for the Eagles to face some sterner tests. They’ll travel to Seattle on Sunday, stay on the West Coast for the week and play the Rams in Los Angeles the following week.

If the Eagles return home at 12-1, look out. They’ll be expected to become the seventh 15-1 team in NFL history as they finish up with games at the Giants and home against the Raiders and Cowboys.

The first two 15-1 teams —1984 49ers and 1985 Bears — won the Super Bowl. The next four —1998 Vikings, 2004 Steelers, 2011 Packers and 2015 Panthers — did not, as you might have heard.

If the Eagles lose two straight, they’ll still be good. And they might not even lose the NFC’s top seed considering the Vikings have their own turbulence to maneuver in back-to-back games in Atlanta and Carolina.

But a 10-3 Eagles team will create a feeding frenzy of doubt because it would be 0-2 in December and 1-3 against teams with a winning record. That seems almost unfathomable right now but, as Vikings 39-year-old philosopher/cornerback Terence Newman has been preaching, things change quickly in this league.

Case in point: Sept. 23, 2017, Arrowhead Stadium. Chiefs 27, Eagles 20.

At that point, Kansas City was 2-0 against the Patriots and Eagles. The same two teams that are 19-1 against teams other than Kansas City.

When Wentz left Kansas City after being sacked four times and posting a season-low 83.0 passer rating, the second-year phenom was 8-10 as a starter. He had interceptions in the first two games and was hardly thought of as an MVP candidate, let alone a 24-year-old front-runner alongside 40-year-old Tom Brady.

At the time, the Chiefs were becoming the talk of the league. Coach Andy Reid was spreading teams out and confusing them with his formations, motions, misdirection calls, speedy youngsters and a surprisingly aggressive Alex Smith at quarterback.

When they won in Week 5, they were the league’s last unbeaten team. Just like the Vikings were last season.

Six games later, they’re 6-5. Just like the Vikings were last season en route to an 8-8 finish.

Since 1990, there have been six teams start 5-0 and miss the playoffs. The Chiefs could become the third one in the past three years, joining the Falcons in 2015 and last year’s Vikings.

What happened?

Blame the Steelers. The Chiefs were averaging 32.8 points per game when the Steelers went into Kansas City and won 19-13 on Oct. 15.

Things have gotten progressively worse as more Cover-2 looks have frustrated the once-explosive Chiefs. In the past two weeks, they’ve scored nine points against a one-win Giants team and 10 points against a Bills team that had just given up 101 points in back-to-back games.

Meanwhile, the Eagles went to halftime leading the Bears 24-0. They led in total yards, 272-33, and first downs, 16-0.

Wow.

They’re good. But how good?

If they treat the Seahawks and Rams in similar fashion, they’re very, very good.